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Aviva, ‘unsafe driver’ celebrities prank passengers in video campaign

Aviva, ‘unsafe driver’ celebrities prank passengers in video campaign

Aviva, ‘unsafe driver’ celebrities prank passengers in video campaign
Major insurer Aviva has tapped some UK celebrities for its latest video campaign that aims to promote safe driving.
 
Aviva’s “Driven to Distraction” short film series features celebrities who surprised members of the public in a prank road trip format, designed to inspire good thinking behind the wheel.
 
Household names such as Tinchy Stryder, The Chuckle Brothers and Made in Chelsea’s Louise Thompson starred in the four-minute films that were made in partnership with Channel 4.
 
Other personalities involved in the video series were Martin Kemp, Radio 1’s Chris Stark and former Pussycat Doll Ashley Roberts.
 
The celebrities got behind the wheel and picked up unsuspecting individuals who believed that they were participating in a television interview show.
 
The celebrity chauffeur then displayed unsafe driving habits that were designed to provoke passenger reaction.
 
Unbeknownst to the passenger, the vehicle was being driven on a track and controlled by a stuntman in a specially constructed pod attached to the roof. Meanwhile, the celebrity was receiving instructions from a hidden ear piece.
 
According to Aviva, the video shorts demonstrated a different driving hazard such as road rage and texting and eating while driving to show the dangers of driving distractions.
 
Research conducted by the insurer showed that four out of five people admit to getting distracted while driving, according to Aviva UK and Ireland customer marketing director Lindsay Forster.
 
“Whether it’s children playing up in the back of the car, or trying to multitask by texting or eating at the wheel, there are a multitude of things which can take people’s minds off the crucial task of being a safe driver,” Forster said.
 
“Our collaboration with Channel 4 is designed to show just how dangerous these habits can be, and while the films are entertaining, there’s a very serious message behind them,” she added. “Whether a driver or passenger, we’d encourage everyone to take a look at the films and think about if there are any steps they could take to help make Britain’s roads safer.”