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Brexit faces new legal challenge

Brexit faces new legal challenge

Brexit faces new legal challenge Britain’s plan to leave the European Union is facing another legal obstacle after members of the Northern Ireland Assembly filed a lawsuit challenging the Brexit move.
 
Politicians Steven Agnew, Colum Eastwood, David Ford and John O’Dowd were among the assembly members that filed the suit seeking a judicial review of the UK’s decision to abide by the June 23 referendum result, media reports said.
 
Legal firm Jones Cassidy Brett represented the assembly members and filed the suit on August 19 at the Northern Ireland’s High Court in Belfast.
 
The assembly members urged Prime Minister Theresa May to consider the UK’s peace process and other unique requirements before triggering the formal Brexit process, according to a report by the Belfast Telegraph.
 
“They want to ensure the Brexit process complies with the rule of law, takes account of parliamentary sovereignty, protects progress made towards a more peaceful society and accords adequate weight to the democratic will of those in Northern Ireland who voted in the European referendum and in the 1998 poll on the Good Friday Agreement,” Jones Cassidy Brett was quoted as saying in the report.
 
“The various assurances sought by our clients have not been forthcoming and, indeed, the response heightened their concerns about the approach the Government was likely to take,” the lawyers added.
 
The latest action is one of the few suits contesting the manner in which May plans to navigate Britain’s departure from the EU, Bloomberg reported.
 
Investment start-up Gina Miller and hairdresser Deir Dos Santos have lodged a suit to force May to consult parliament before activating the EU withdrawal clause.
 
“This claim differs from other actions being taken in relation to the triggering of Article 50,” the Bloomberg quoted the lawyers as saying. “The actions in London do not, it is understood, deal with the unique requirements of Northern Ireland constitutional law and statute.”
 
 
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