Michigan to pilot implementation of roadside drug testing law

Michigan to pilot implementation of roadside drug testing law

Michigan to pilot implementation of roadside drug testing law Michigan will test the implementation of a newly passed measure that provides for random drug testing of drivers for mind altering substances such as marijuana, heroin and cocaine, a recent report said.

The pilot will extend for one year and will be conducted by specifically trained personnel. Shannon Banner, a spokesperson for the Michigan State Police, said they have yet to determine the five counties where the pilot will be conducted. 

“While the legislation takes effect later this month, the one-year pilot will not begin until we finalize the five counties where the pilot will take place, evaluate and choose a testing instrument, and develop policies, procedures and training. We expect to have everything in place in late fall, at which time we will make an announcement with more specifics on how the pilot will work,” Banner explained.

The state government will use the test period to determine the accuracy and reliability of the testing kits to build competence among drug recognition experts in addressing the problem of impaired driving on Michigan roads.
However, Southfield criminal defense attorney Neil Rockind said the science behind the law is “ridiculous” because of inherent flaws in the testing method.

Michigan passed the law after a 2013 crash killed two people, with the truck driver who ran a red light and caused the collision testing positive for marijuana. The truck driver, Harley Durocher, was sentenced to a 15-year prison term.