Dive In Festival to tread new ground

Dive In Festival to tread new ground

Dive In Festival to tread new ground International diversity and inclusion festival Dive In will return in 2017 with the Australian leg of the event set to break new ground for the industry.

The event, set to be held September 26-28, returns to Australia after a successful first year in 2016 and organisers are already “way ahead of the game” for this year’s event, according to Chris Mackinnon, Lloyd’s general representative in Australia.

Organised by Inclusion@Lloyd’s, sponsors for the event include Marsh, Aon, Willis Towers Watson, XL Catlin and Chubb, and this year’s theme will be Diversity Dividend.

Mackinnon told Insurance Business that the Australian leg of the global event will look to break new ground for the local industry with the development of an industry survey centred on diversity and inclusion.

Lloyd’s is currently working with an organising group and service provider to make the survey a reality - it will look to launch original data and research on how the Australian industry is faring on issues of diversity.

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“The intention is to basically draw a line in the sand at the 2017 festival and tell everybody what we know, and then give people some tips and some ideas and some strategies about how to change and improve,” Mackinnon said.

“Then, in 2018, when we run the survey again, hopefully we can demonstrate that we are actually making a difference.”

Mackinnon said that eight organisations are already locked-in as event leads for the 2017 event as Lloyd’s will look to hold events in Melbourne, Perth and multiple events in Sydney.

“It’s really taken off, which is absolutely spectacular,” Mackinnon continued.

“This is the whole insurance market and industry coming together collaboratively in a non-competitive way to do something that is important for us, as an industry.”


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