Accuro launches free mental health service for members

Accuro launches free mental health service for members | Insurance Business New Zealand

Accuro launches free mental health service for members

Insurance company Accuro has launched a free mental health service to help its members gain easy and quick access to mental health diagnosis and support.

The Ministry of Health found that around 47% of Kiwis will experience a mental illness and/or addiction at some point in their lives – prompting Accuro to launch a service that can provide fast, comprehensive, and confidential access to mental health professionals.

The Mental Health Navigator, launched by Accuro in partnership with Best Doctors, first launched in Canada in 2016 then made its way to Australia. Now, Accuro members are among the first Kiwis to gain access to the service.

“This is the first time such a quick, easy and professional mental health support service has been available to New Zealanders through health insurance,” said Geoff Annals, chief executive officer at Accuro.

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The Mental Health Navigator is now available for everyone over 18 who are covered by an Accuro Specialist Plan.

A call to the service will be answered by a specialist mental health nurse then followed up within 10 to 14 days by a video call with psychologists and psychiatrists – who can diagnose mental health conditions, develop a treatment plan, and act as a valuable second opinion. The nurse will then provide follow-up support over the next six to 12 months.

“Fast access to diagnosis and treatment is an important part of people getting better before they get worse, and with typical wait times of two to six months through the public system, we feel access within two weeks can make a dramatic difference to a person’s wellbeing,” Annals said.

“Mental Health Navigator is free, and people can access the service without having to leave their own home, an important detail for members who might be fearful of hospital appointments, or have trouble travelling to them.”